Cool Machining China Large Parts images

Some cool machining large parts images:

British Airways L1011-500 G-BLUT

Image by caribb
A Blast from the Past
-Actually this was my flight out to London Heathrow here at Mirabel Airport. I don’t have a date but I’m guessing the late 1980s (1985 or 1986). G-BLUT. I flew on their TriStar 500s twice in the late 80s most likely 1985.

*Airplanes 101* (See Airplanes 101 Set)
>Name: Lockheed L1011-500 TriStar
>Manufacturer: Lockheed (USA)
>Main Role: long-medium range wide body jetliner
>Basic design: Three engined double aisle wide body jet.
>Capacity: 234 passengers
>Range: 10200km
>First delivery date: 1978
>Still in production in 2008: No
>Easily confused for: DC-10 & MD-11
>Main Characteristics Look for the tail integrated engine intake at the top rear of the fuselage. The -500 version has a aerodynamic wind faring built into the base of the engine intake to create better wind flow. The -500 variant is also 4.3 meters shorter than the standard -100 variant. The -500 version also scrapped the emergency exit at the rear of the plane and replaced both with standard size exits thus eliminating the one positioned closed to the rear of the wing on the larger -100/200 variants.
>Examples of Main Operators: None, most are out of service today but those that are are in Asia for the most part. The RAF still flies some and they may show up in major cities in Spain with a few charter carriers still using them. They were the main long haul workhorse for Eastern Airlines, TWA, ANA, Air Canada, Cathay Pacific and British Airways for years.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L1011

A girl riveting machine operator at the Douglas Aircraft Company plant joins sections of wing ribs to reinforce the inner wing assemblies of B-17F heavy bombers, Long Beach, Calif. Better known as the “Flying Fortress,” the B-17F bomber is a later model o

Image by The Library of Congress
Palmer, Alfred T.,, photographer.

A girl riveting machine operator at the Douglas Aircraft Company plant joins sections of wing ribs to reinforce the inner wing assemblies of B-17F heavy bombers, Long Beach, Calif. Better known as the "Flying Fortress," the B-17F bomber is a later model of the B-17, which distinguished itself in action in the south Pacific, over Germany and elsewhere. It is a long range, high altitude, heavy bomber, with a crew of seven to nine men — and with armament sufficient to defend itself on daylight missions

1942 Oct.

1 transparency : color.

Notes:
Title from FSA or OWI agency caption.
Transfer from U.S. Office of War Information, 1944.

Subjects:
Airplane industry
Women–Employment
World War, 1939-1945
Assembly-line methods
Drilling
United States–California–Long Beach

Format: Transparencies–Color

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Part Of: Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information Collection 12002-39 (DLC) 93845501

General information about the FSA/OWI Color Photographs is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.fsac

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsac.1a35336

Call Number: LC-USW36-102

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