Image from page 212 of “Railway mechanical engineer” (1916)

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Image from page 212 of “Railway mechanical engineer” (1916)

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Identifier: railwaymechanica94newy
Title: Railway mechanical engineer
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Railroad engineering Engineering Railroads Railroad cars
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Simmons-Boardman Pub. Co

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P. on applying spring seats for EngineersSoviet, labor turnover shop, newest ruling of wage adjust-ments, etc., wondering How long, O Lord, how long willone suit last. as he are impotent to provide otherwise. ChiefClerks hopeful return RR March 1 make possible securingmuch needed new suit, if not must stay home. In next letter will record plight of despised storekeeper. Ino AMStniA. Pennsyhania Decapod. Type lis Pennsylvania Decapod Shows High Economy Report of Tests Comparing lis, Hand andStoker Fired, wilti the Performance of the Lis Mikado IX 1916 the Pennsylvania Railroad built a locomotive ofthe 2-10-0 type with cylinders working at a maximumcut-off of 50 per cent. This locomotive with minoralterations was adopted for hea\y freight service and a largenumber of the clas lis, as this type is designated, are nowin use. The design of this locomotive was described in theRaihi-ay Mechanical Engineer for July, 1917, page 370.Details of the performance as disclosed by the results of test

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zo 4c 00 ao 100 izo 140 leo laoDry Coal Fired Per Sq. Fl of Ora-fs Per Hour, Pounds.Fig. 1. Rate of Combustion and Boiier Efficiency plant trials, are now available in Bulletin No. 31 (copy-right 1919 by the Pennsylvania Railroad), from which theinformation in this article has been secured. In discussing the considerations which led to the develop-ment of the lis the bulletin points out that many locomotives,in helping service especially, are worked almost continuouslywith a cut-off near the end of the stroke. If they weredesigned so as to work at but SO per cent cut-off when infull gear, without a sacrifice of drawbar pull, there wouldbe gained the difference between the coal and water rates atfull stroke cut-off and those at half stroke, or a saving ofapproximately 25 per cent. The locomotive neeoed at anumber of points on tlie Pennsylvania was one having adrawbar pull 25 per cent greater than that of the class Lis,Mikado type, or one having a pull of about 75,000 lb. at 10miles an

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Image from page 432 of “Railway and locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock” (1901)

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Identifier: railwaylocomotiv16newy
Title: Railway and locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Railroads Locomotives
Publisher: New York : A. Sinclair Co

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. In the accompanying drawings I haveillustrated my improved four-way cockas follows; Fig. I is a plan view of my four-waycock. Fig. 2 is a side view. Fig. 3 is asectional view on line X X of Fig. I.Fig. 4 is a sectional view on line 5 5 ofFig. 2. Fig. 5 is a view showing the ap-plication of the invention to a train-line,and Fig. 6 represents diagrams showingthe various service positions. FUj. .3 Jiaitway J Lt>cvma;tv4 t:n^.nteriii^ In the drawings the numeral I desig-nates the shell or casing having a taperedr>])ening 2 therethrough, and air-pass-ages or ports 3 and 4 communicating withthe said opening and train-line connec-tions or ends 5, and a similar port 6 com-municating with said opening and triplevalve end 7. A tapered plug-valve 8 is fitted intothe tapered opening of the casing and isheld in position by a spring 9 and capTO. The plug-valve is provided with aside or cut-away part 11. straight-awaypart 12, and part 13 branching from saidstraight-away part, which parts are

Text Appearing After Image:
y iloiilCl:^ J i<ift.nt«flie £nif.n«rfM7 adapted to register with the parts in thecasing and with the dead-air ports 14. At the upper end of the casing is foundfour stop-notches 15, and to the top oftlie plug is attached a handle 16, which isprovided with a spring catch 17 to en-gage said stop notches. Said spring andnotches serve to indicate the position andretain the cock in such position. In practice the train-line is connectedto the ends 5 and the pipe leading to thetriple valve to the end 7. If it is desiredto let air from the train-line on the leftto the triple valve, the cock is turnedinto position shown at Figs, i, 2, 3 or 4and at B of Fig. 6. To let air from thetrain-line into triple valve at right, thecock is turned one quarter, as at C,Fig. 6. From both cars to triple th< cock isas at D, Fig. 6, and for straight-awaytrain-line as at A, Fig. 6, the stop-spring Fia. s

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Image from page 118 of “Official proceedings” (1901)

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Identifier: officialproceedi01rail
Title: Official proceedings
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors: Railway Club of Pittsburgh
Subjects: Railway Club of Pittsburgh Railroads
Publisher: Pittsburgh, Pa. : The Club

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ed to be square, or as nearly so as could beobtained by mean^ of trams, but on being placed in service andthe indicator applied, the valves were found to be out ; furtlier-more, the indicator cards will also tell whether your cylinders arebeing properly oiled or not. I will pass around for observationseveral cards showing the effect of insufficient lubrication. Youwill notice that area representing the work done, of the head end,is very much reduced. By increasing the supply of oil from fiveto fifteen drops per minute, the diagrams again become normal.By means of the indicator we were able to detect a springing inthe valve gear, and this trouble was overcome by substituting anintermediate blade or motion bar of I Beam section for one of arectangular and smaller section. i.5~s: 10 WHEEL PASS. EMG-PISTON VALVES£0xe&-7eDRW!lR5-ec:.b UBS PRESSUFSeJ inside: LA.P 5 exHAUS\ CLtARM^CCai. LEIAD 5. BLIt4l) BACK LiP ECCCMTRIC5PEED ee MILF_5 F-tR HOUR NITIAL. PRE.S5UPE£Oe UBS Cl.eAR^NCC

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ATMOaPHERir. I IMF BACK PRESSURE-3-^LBS ZERO PRESfSURF Herewith is an indicator diagram enlarged six times, it be-ing taken from a 20×28, 72 drivers, 10 wheel passenger engine,225 ft)s. boiler pressure, at 22 miles per hour. The engine isequipped with inside admission piston vahes having inside lap 64 Proceedings Railway Club of Pittsburgh. i, and }i exhaust clearance. The valve was set 3V lead fullgear and /^ blind in back-up motion. This card shows very con-spicuously the four events of the stroke, and may be consideredan ideal card for the speed, showing almost equality betweenareas, and cut offs for the two ends, and show^s only 3}^ lbs.average back pressure. This card was taken when assisting afreight train over a i /r grade. President.—Are there any gentlemen present who wish toask Mr. Dreyfus any questions ? Mr. Hubbell :—I want to say just one word more in refer-ence to ths work. In Mr. Dreyfus remarks he spoke of spring-ing valve movement. Your work, no matter how thoroug

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