Image from web page 199 of “Electric railway journal” (1908)

A couple of good wire electric discharge machining images I discovered:

Image from page 199 of “Electric railway journal” (1908)

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Identifier: electricrailway371911newy
Title: Electric railway journal
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Electric railroads
Publisher: [New York] McGraw Hill Pub. Co

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elected Oregon cross-arms coated with P &amp B paint.The steel towers have specific malleable iron pins which arebolted direct to the angles comprising parts of the towers.They are placed to act as cross-arms. The only positions where the cables are cut are at towersNos. two and four, exactly where the circular mils on the principal leads aremade up of all types of combinations. The cables were takendirect from the power home wall to tower No. 1, then divided,one-half going to tower No. two and the other half going to towerNo. four. They have been dead-ended in each and every case in the followingmanner: The cables had been served into the eye-bolt of an Ohio Brass34-in. Brooklyn strain insulator, the insulator getting attached toa J^-in. eye bolt, which goes clear by means of a piece of 4-in. x6-in. chosen oak. The nut is covered up and protected, toavoid make contact with with the metal parts of the tower. These oakdead-end pieces each hold six cables and are fastened to thetower suitable with 34-in. machine bolts placed amongst the cable

Text Appearing Following Image:
View of Portion of One of the Denver Steel Towers positions and extending via amongst two channels laidtogether with an open space enough for the bolt, with a 2-in.square washer under the nut on the back side. The channelsreferred to are created and placed so that every set requires thestrain of six 1,000,000 circ. mil cables with a dip of 8 in. in a 50-in. span. The placing of the oak dead-ends, in addition to the Brook-lyn strain insulators, in between the feeder and tower was thoughtnecessary on account of lightning discharges. All bends or 174 ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL. [Vol. XXXVII. No. 4. angles had been carried about by implies of Brooklyn strains andW. N. Matthews &amp Brothers cable clamps, which made a veryneat piece of building. Formerly the firm braided ona piece of 5/16-in. span wire for the identical situations underwhich the clamps are now used. Therefore, the saving in copperover the old strategy is not massive, but the clamps are preferredbecause they are quicker to apply, the

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Image from page 221 of “Electric railway gazette” (1895)

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Identifier: electricrailwayg13newy
Title: Electric railway gazette
Year: 1895 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Electric railroads
Publisher: New York : [W.J. Johnston Co.]

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e from thewall, with a passage-way behind it to allow the connec-tions to be reached. The face of the board is fitted withtwo Kelvin multicellular voltmeters, one for each and every sectionof the line, i. e., the portion above and the portion belowthe feeding points it also is offered with an ammeterfor every machine, a magnetic blow-out lightning arrester,and an automatic cut-out apparatus which will comeinto action in the occasion of a dead-quick occurring any-where on the method. By the side of the switchboard isthe phone box, which is in communication with bothends of the line and with the battery house atLaxey. The telephone wires are at present, by-the-bye,carried on the tops of the conductor poles but weunderstand it is intended shortly to spot them on separatepoles. An accumulator station which is situated at theLaxey terminus is completely equipped with a battery of 246cells of the S.P. kind of chloride cells, the S.P. signi-fying that these are specially protected by implies of asbes-

Text Appearing After Image:
PROFILE OF THE ROAD. tos cloth packing and by special arrangement of the grid,to withstand a quite higher price of discharge, such as isinevitable in traction work or even, for a short period, acomplete brief-circuit. The cells are contained in strongclear glass vessels, mounted in sawdust trays upon glassinsulators, the entire of the battery being supported on astout timber staging—on a single level—set upon an asphaltfloor. They are contained within the higher portion of aneat wooden creating, the lesser portion of which servesthe goal of a switch room, and is separated from thebattery room by a wooden partition. These rooms arewell ventilated and lit by implies of two skylights runningalong the length of the roof. The goal of the cells is simply to serve as an elec-trical regulator of the pressure on the line, by which meansthe variations of supply to the cars may well be produced with-out undue fall of stress and with out imposing a suddengreat increase of load on the generators. In regard

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Image from page 676 of “Electric railway journal” (1908)

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Identifier: electricrailway491917newy
Title: Electric railway journal
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Electric railroads
Publisher: [New York] McGraw Hill Pub. Co

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ix^NGER IN USE AS TROLLEY Help AND AS STRAININSULATOR FOR SPAN WIRE the axis of the insulator, is screwed into the ear of thecontact wire. By simply removing this bolt the ear canbe changed while the span wire is left undisturbed.When utilized as a strain insulator at a pole, the span wirefits in the groove in place of the clip, and the boltclamps the two ends of the pole collar which match in slotsprovided in the ends of the insulator. Hangers of this variety are now installed on severalWestern lines. Throughout the two years they have been inuse on the Kansas City Railways it is said that nofailures have been reported, though they have beensubjected to extremely severe tests. Sphere Gaps Offer AdditionalProtection for Higher-VoltageLightning Arresters The use of sphere gaps is a single of the most current develop-ments in the style of aluminum electrolytic lightningarresters for voltages above 7250. For reduce voltagesthe diameter of the copper rod used to make the horn

Text Appearing Following Image:
SPHERE GAPS WITHAUXILIARY HORNS gap is so large in proportion to the gap that the effectis the identical. The illustration shows a sphere gap de-signed by the General Electric Company, Schenectady,N. Y., for 70,000-volt lightning arresters. The upper April 7, 1917] ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 655 spheres have a horn to assist the arc to rise and be ex-tinguished quickly. A horn is unnecessary on the lowerspheres as the arc swiftly rises to the upper ones and isextinguished. Situations are not uncommon in which a voltage in theform of a sudden impulse has broken down what wasapparently not the easiest path. For example, the volt-age might rise beyond the 60-cycle discharge voltage ofthe protective gaps and arc-more than a machine or punctureinsulation which has withstood a significantly greater test volt-age than that for which the spark gaps were set. Toavoid such occurrences it is crucial to have the sparkgaps as fast acting as feasible. It is claimed thesphere gap is more rapidly than the horn gap, and that it

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page photos that could have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations could not perfectly resemble the original function.

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